Paul Revere by Cyrus Dallin, North End, Boston

~~~

~~~

.

.
Seen on Boston Common Today

.

Fact: Not a single Nazi was the victim of vehicular homicide in Boston today.

Sunday, August 2, 2015

Sunday Science Blog


Meet the Panda Ant (which isn't actually an ant, but a wingless wasp):




Panda Ant


Cute and cuddly as a panda?  Well, no:


The Panda Ant is a most unusual species of insect. Their name derives from the obvious resemblance to a panda in its markings. This remarkable insect is not even an ant. The Panda Ant is actually a variety of wingless wasp! They were first discovered in 1938. Very little is known of this little seen insect. They are only known to exist in coastal regions of Chile. Their sting is exceptionally powerful for their size. They have been seen to bring down animals as large as cows with only a few dozen stings.



It's a fascinating insect for many reasons not the least of which is its dimorphism:


Panda Ant Physical Characteristics and Behavior The Panda Ant displays extreme sexual dimorphism. The difference in both appearance and behavior is so pronounced, the two sexes are often mistaken for entirely separate species! 

The male is several times larger than the female. He may attain a length of approximately 0.3 in (mm). The males are winged, but the females are wingless. The males are nocturnal. The females are typically active during the day. The Panda Ant feeds primarily upon nectar. After mating, the female seeks the nest of a ground dwelling insect, such as a bee or wasp. There she deposits her eggs. When they hatch, they will feed upon the larva present.




More about mutillidae HERE.


And HERE.



2 comments:

Infidel753 said...

They have been seen to bring down animals as large as cows with only a few dozen stings.

Considering how tiny the volume of injected toxin must be, this must be one of the most powerful poisons on Earth.

There she deposits her eggs. When they hatch, they will feed upon the larva present.

Once again I'm glad that the endless creatures with such revolting habits are too small to practice them on us humans.

Thanks for the post -- I hadn't heard of this beast before.

(O)CT(O)PUS said...

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Here are the life and times of a Hexavespidasterix.